Ken Burns’ 10th Inning

Posted: December 14, 2010 in baseball, MLB
Tags: , , , , , , ,

As Stank-0 has repeatedly said, he is not a baseball fan, but baseball is an undeniable part of the American fabric.  The jargon of baseball is woven into our lexicon.  People tend to criticize baseball players more than anyone else because you don’t have to be a physical freak/specimen to play the game.  This was brought home to Stank-0 while watching this documentary.

The documentary chronicled baseball from the 90s to the present.  Stank-0 learned why Barry Bonds was such a difficult person to deal with, he watched how his father, Bobby Bonds, was treated and acted accordingly.

Stank-0 also was re-introduced to how trill Ken Griffey Jr was.  His swing = Shuttlesworth’s jumper. This isn’t negotiable.

Stank-0 didn’t realize how crucial the 94 strike was to baseball.  Tony Gwynn was within striking distance of hitting .400.  The Expos were also on the verge of replacing the Braves as the best team in baseball.

After baseball resumed in ’95, the Expos faded and Tony (and no one else) was ever again in striking distance of hitting 400.   Stank-0 also didn’t realize how important Cal Ripken Jr was to helping baseball recover that season.  People were generally caught up in his consecutive games played streak.

Let’s jump to ’98.  A young Stank-0 was also excited by Slammin Sammy and Big Mac’s presuit of 61.  Stank-0 even remembers NBC Nightly News talkin about it during that summer.

Mac’s use of enhancements was broken that year, and the writer was subsequently vilified.  The story faded and Mac ended the season with 70.

The documentary ended with Bonds contempt for the casual fans’ adulation for the homer run chase so he made a decision to break it so he could get some buzz.  That’s where the documentary concluded.  Part 2 coming soon.

Comments
  1. […] was glad to see the culmination of Ken Burns‘ 10th inning.  It continued with everything that happened since the homer run chase of 98. Barry Bonds was […]

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